Reverse angle parking to stay in Blayney after community voices are heard

WIDE AND FREE: The main street of Blayney will remain reverse angle.
WIDE AND FREE: The main street of Blayney will remain reverse angle.

If there was one aspect within the recently released Blayney main street concept plans that brought the community together, it was the overwhelming opposition to the idea of introducing parallel parking on Adelaide Street.

Across social media and letters to the editors the concept plans were in most part howled down and ridiculed, despite the fact that they were just that, concept plans put in place to begin a robust discussion on the direction of the town centre.

After the release of the concepts plans the community consultation process commenced and there were 100 surveys and written submissions received from residents, business and community members on the concept plan prepared by Place Design Group.

Those submissions have now been collated and a project update has been released by Blayney Shire Council.

It's good to see that council and the consultants really are listening to what the community want.

Heather Ferguson.

It may come as no surprise that over 80 per cent of those respondents are in favour of retaining reverse angle parking in Adelaide Street.

Chair of the Blayney Town Association Heather Ferguson said that the update was a promising next step.

"It's good to see that council and the consultants really are listening to what the community want," she said.

The update notes that 60 per cent of respondents were in favour of reconfiguring the access and design of the Railway Station entry.

Another factor that was noted in the responses is the safe movement of pedestrians along and across Adelaide Street and the speed with which vehicles travel along it.

To that end the update states that 'Crossing points with pram ramps should be provided at key locations along Adelaide Street, including mid block between Ogilvy and Church Streets, and Church and Burns Street, and the existing intersection at Burns/Waters Street be reconfigured to provide for the safe movement of pedestrians and vehicles outside the Post Office.'

The introduction of a 40km/hr high pedestrian zone is noted in the update as being the preferred solution rather than the narrowing of the main street with parklets, gardens, bike lanes and other infrastructure.

The beautification of Adelaide Street will still occur, however it won't involve widespread street narrowing or other works, rather it could lead to a restoration program for those buildings in desperate need of a facelift as well as festoon lighting, high canopy trees, pot plants and flower beds.

Other key themes identified in the feedback are using the streets of Blayney and the Belubula River Walk as a cycle route, continue to explore the provision of one way traffic flow in Farm Lane and Henry Street between Ogilvy Street and Burns Streets and improved footpath surfaces and pram ramp installations.

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