Tim Ferguson recalls life in Blayney

Roll model: Australian comedy legend Tim Ferguson is set to bring his new show, 'A Fast Life on Wheels,' to the Central West later this month.

Roll model: Australian comedy legend Tim Ferguson is set to bring his new show, 'A Fast Life on Wheels,' to the Central West later this month.

Blayney born comedian Tim Ferguson knows exactly when it was that he realised that the best humour is that based on real-life events.

"It was one of those windy, sleety, minus four days and there was a Blayney local walking down the street in a pair of thongs, stubbies and wearing a singlet and I thought 'that's Blayney right there, we just don't care.'"

Tim rose to fame as one third of the Doug Anthony Allstars and he will be taking his new show A Fast Life on Wheels to the Bathurst Memorial Entertainment Centre on September 28.

A Fast Life On Wheels will see Ferguson dissect his life story through the use of intelligent humour, from his time as a member of the Doug Anthony All Stars [DAAS] to the progression of his multiple sclerosis [MS] condition.

Tim's father was former Lyndhurst Shire Chronicle Editor Tony Ferguson who Tim said improved the readership by making the paper tabloid.

"Whatever was happening at the sales was a crisis all the time," he said. "That was when they had a big old printer that looked like it came from Charles Dicken's times."

Tim's father had a beef farm on Brown's Creek road and his memories of Blayney, like many ex -locals, is all about the weather.

"The best thing about Blayney's weather is that Oberon's is worse," he said.

"I say in my show that you should never live anywhere that has a lot of wind farms. Those ones out at Carcoar are not far at all from where I lived."

Not only does he think that the weather is cold, but he tells his Canada born wife that Blayney's weather is sinister.

"Blayney's weather knows your name, it knows where you are and it's coming to get you," he said.

For anyone that has seen a comedian live, or even popular bands, the artist will inevitably make a joke about local towns and the people that inhabit them.

The advantage for Tim is that he knows the area backwards.

"I left some of the graffiti that I hope is still there," he laughs.

Tim has been doing his Blayney research and has been commenting on Blayney based Facebook pages.

He's impressed to find that Blayney now has a cafe, and was surprised to find that there was actually now more than one.

"In the early days you'd get a glass of Nescafe with hot frothy milk," he said.

Tim's also impressed with CentrePoint and Carrington Park and said that the cold is what makes the town unique.

"The cold keeps it special because it gets rid of all the weak ones, all the hipsters and yuppies only last to the end of March."