Millthorpe Public School to be expanded and upgraded

Celebrations: The younger students at Millthorpe Public School will witness a massive transformation of the school over the coming years. Photo: Mark Logan.
Celebrations: The younger students at Millthorpe Public School will witness a massive transformation of the school over the coming years. Photo: Mark Logan.

For the fourteen years that the principal of Millthorpe Public School Joanne Jackett has been there, she's watched demountable classroom after demountable classroom being lowered onto the school grounds.

That though is set to change with the announcement on Friday by Bathurst MP Paul Toole that the school is to be upgraded and extended as part of the NSW Governments $6 billion school building program.

Mr Toole said that the upgrade will include brand new buildings and upgraded core facilities.

"The planning and the design work has commenced and the Department of Education will talk to the staff and the wider community for their input into these brand new buildings," he said.

Ms Jackett said that the school's size has almost tripled in 14 years.

"We only had 120 students back then and now we're just over three hundred and the growth has been steady and constant over that time," she said.

The school currently has eight demountable classrooms and only four permanent ones, a situation that causes considerable problems for both staff and students.

"When it's wet, cold and snowing there is no covered access and the children have to travel quite a long way in those conditions to get into class," Ms Jackett said.

Although planning is in the early stages, Ms Jackett said that it was almost a complete rebuild of the school.

Ms Jackett and Paul Toole at the announcement on Friday.

Ms Jackett and Paul Toole at the announcement on Friday.

'In preliminary discussions we've been looking at 10 new classrooms, new toilet facilities, admin and staff facilities and also looking at improving traffic concerns around the school," she said.

Not only has the school been left without permanent classrooms as it's grown, the staff have been sacrificing some creature comforts.

"Not only have we had a growth in student numbers, we've also seen a tripling of staff numbers as well," Ms Jackett said.

"We have 35 staff here and only one toilet, so when they have a ten minute break they all want to get to that bathroom."