Teacher Andrew Orme-Smith says becoming Australian citizen is 'a real privilege'

WELCOME: Andrew Orme-Smith is presented with his citizenship certificate by Blayney mayor Scott Ferguson. Photo: DECLAN RURENGA

WELCOME: Andrew Orme-Smith is presented with his citizenship certificate by Blayney mayor Scott Ferguson. Photo: DECLAN RURENGA

Andrew Orme-Smith originally called Kenya home, but now he’s the latest Blayney resident who can Australia home.

Mr Orme-Smith took his citizenship pledge before a meeting of Blayney Shire Council.

“It’s a real privilege,” Mr Orme-Smith said.

The grandson of Kenyan tea farmers, his family was also in the photograph safari tour business.

It was during his time at university in Sydney that he met his wife, Tachir.

It’s a sense of identity and feeling I can contribute more. - Andrew Orme-Smith

Together they have a daughter, Sala and son, Marco.

They moved to Kenya for a decade before returning to Australia. Mr Orme-Smith teaches art at St Stanilaus’ College in Bathurst.

“It feels like Australia is home now, my wife is Australia, my kids are Australian. It’s a change of outlook, a good feeling,” Mr Orme-Smith said.

“I should have done it earlier,” he joked.

Mr Orme-Smith said regional Australia felt familiar to Kenya.

“Rural Australia is very familiar in many ways to the Rift Valley where I grew up, with the mix of regional towns, rural areas and a bit of wilderness,” he said.

Mr Orme-Smith said he was looking forward to having a bigger say in Australian life including being able to vote.

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